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MAKE HEALTH EQUAL IN THE NORTH EAST
Because of things like income, housing and jobs, babies born in parts of the NORTH EAST could live
16 years less than in other parts of the UK.

Discover the life expectancy in your area

The number of years a person can expect to live is affected by many things, from good-quality homes, to neighbourhoods with green space and clean air.

Discover the life expectancy where you live.

HOW DOES LIFE EXPECTANCY COMPARE ACROSS THE UK?
74years
The national average81
90years

LIFE EXPECTANCY

The world around us shapes our health and wellbeing.

From quality homes that are warm and safe, to stable jobs, social connections, and neighbourhoods with green space and clean air, these are the building blocks that have a lasting and positive impact on people’s health, and reduce health inequalities.

In the North East and across the UK, these building blocks are not available to everyone, or not at the quality needed.

Data on children under 16 in relative low-income families from the OHID Fingertips Public Health Data.

1 in 5

children in the North East are living in poverty.

7.2 µg/m3 compared to WHO healthy level of 5µg/m3. Data taken from OHID Fingertips Public Health Data.

Air pollution

in the North East is too high. The level of fine particle pollution breaches the World Health Organisation’s healthy levels.

32.2% of people not reaching the minimum income standard. Data from the OHID Fingertips Public Health Data.

1/3

of people in the North East do not have enough money to live well.

WE ASKED PEOPLE IN NEWCASTLE WHAT THEY THINK THE AVERAGE LIFE EXPECTANCY IN THEIR AREA IS, AND THE THINGS THAT CONTRIBUTE MOST TO THEIR HEALTH.

Find out what they said…

WHAT ARE PEOPLE FACING AND HOW DO WE CHANGE THINGS?
  • Tackling socioeconomic inequalities and social injustice

    Alex, 18, lives on the Longbenton estate in Newcastle. Suffering from social anxiety resulted in them being home schooled, which left them feeling isolated, lonely and fearing others. These complex issues acted as barriers to training and employment opportunities, further exacerbated by the pandemic.

    In 2023, Alex became involved in Justice Prince CIC’s Barriers to Employment project, which aims to tackle socioeconomic inequalities and social injustice for the benefit of disadvantaged, vulnerable and excluded individuals and communities living in the area. 

    Alex quickly flourished, and their confidence increased. In a short period, Alex demonstrated skills that led to them being employed in a paid trainee role within the project.  

    Reflecting on their experience, Alex said ‘I never thought in a million years I’d have done the things I’ve done in this job. It has challenged me no end, but I’ve always felt supported. I feel proud to be involved.’

  • A thriving community house working to build local capacity and skills, combat unemployment, and provide social and leisure opportunities

    Sarah Gorman is Chief Executive at Edberts House, a community project in Gateshead that uses local skills to meet local needs. It is a thriving community house working to build local capacity and skills, combat unemployment, provide social and leisure opportunities, and promote health and wellbeing. There is also a young people and families team providing prevention and early intervention support. 

    When Edberts House began in 2009, they spent time chatting to people, and worked together to create a warm, welcoming space in the heart of the area. People quickly began sharing about challenges they were facing: poor housing, financial worries, lack of transport and employment, and loneliness.   

    Working with GPs, Edberts House has launched a Community Linking Project – a team based at GP services which can support people around the wider determinants of their health. They now works across 24 surgeries in Gateshead and last year supported 3,223 people.  

  • Working with employers to make healthier workplaces

    The Better Health at Work Award is a public health programme, established in 2009. The award specifically targets the workplace as a setting, covering the whole of the Northeast England and Cumbria. 

    These regions have some of the worst health outcomes in the country, largely driven by ingrained health inequalities. Lack of good work is a huge barrier and the Award works with regional employers to deliver on a holistic health and wellbeing framework to foster happier, healthier workplaces that support and empower happier, healthier workers. 

    With more than 500 workplaces participating and directly reaching 250,000 workers, workplaces has run campaign activities and contributed to an average reduction in sickness absence of 0.4 days per employee.  

Let’s #MakeHealthEqual

Sign up to find out more about our future campaigns and how you can help shape a society where each of us has the best chance of good health, no matter where we’re born.

Sign up to find out more about our campaigns and how you can help shape a society where each of us has the best chance of good health, no matter where we’re born.

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We travelled the UK to find out how

regions compare

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